Examples of     
  Diana Pearl McNutt's     Research  

Speaker at International Conference on Digital Decisions in Cultural and Scientific Heritage

European Digital Week

Presentation was entitiled-  Diving into the Practical- 3D Best Practices in Heritage. This lockdown has shown how museums, archaeology and research can continue in a digital world when the physical is no longer accessible. This presentation addressed how practical structures, good housekeeping and universal standards need to be discussed for 3D to become a truly universal part of how we interact with heritage. Sadly, they are severely lacking even during this digital heritage boom and need to be addressed urgently.

Research Video- Pictorialism, Authorship and 3D Models in Heritage

My dissertation was born out of pure frustration with the complete lack of direct literature on this subject. So, I decided to write my own. For example, the field of 3D modelling is so new that there was no 3D modelling citation style for me to use, so I had to configure my own. I discuss this issue in a research video entitled Pictorialism, Authorship and 3D Models in Heritage where by looking to the very origins of photography as an art form we can determine how 3D models are placed within academia and the wider heritage field.

Research Poster

Annual Conference of the British Association for Biological Anthropology and Osteoarcheology

The poster is titled Digital Recording Techniques for Osteological Material: A Comparison Between Standard High-Resolution Photography, Light Revolution System, and Photogrammetry. This poster compares digital recording techniques that I produced for PhD student Florencia Botta who co-authored this poster with me. We compared the results that are produced by each technique to see how they can aid the study of osteological materials and cases of repatriation and reburial

Research Presentation

Society for Museum Archaeology Annual
Conference

This rapid-fire presentation was of Ms McNutt's initial research of 3D visualization projects, which is part of an expanding field of digitalization in the heritage sector. While these projects offer enormous benefits in research and outreach, the lure of the final products overshadows the need for a system of curation and documentation from the beginning to the end of the projects. 

 

The dissertation was awarded the Departmental Best Dissertation Prize in 2019. The dissertation was also nominated for the Geoff Egan Prize for Finds Research and the Royal Archeological Institute Tony Baggs Undergraduate Dissertation Award. Ms McNutt's accompanying research into Digital Imaging and SfM Photogrammetry was awarded a Special Prize for Contributions to the Archaeology Department Research and Collections at the University of Reading